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Power Dynamics

Blaming the Naughty Plebs again!

How our rulers rewrite history to dissociate themselves from their earlier crimes

Ever since the corona scare started earlier this year, the mainstream media has raised the profile of assorted opinion leaders, movers and shakers, closely aligned with what we may call the biotech industrial complex, a curious outgrowth of the better-understood military industrial complex. Some players such as Neil Ferguson, Chris Whitty and Anthony Fauci had stayed away from the limelight outside biomedical circles, but have suddenly risen to prominence in daily televised briefings. Others are seasoned public speakers. Most notably the venerable BBC have given regular prime time slots to the likes of Bill Gates, Tony Blair and Alastair Campbell. Now they’re not selling us proprietary software or regime change wars, but a synchronised global response to an overhyped pandemic, which leading virologists such as Nobel Laureate Michael Levitt of Stanford University believe is no worse than a strong seasonal flu. Every perceived crisis seems to warrant solutions leading us in the same direction: greater surveillance, less personal independence and more global governance. Meanwhile powerful well-funded non-governmental organisations, egged on by the mainstream media, orchestrate campaigns against the symbology and cultural paradigms of what we may best call the Old World Order.

It seems only yesterday when the British establishment draped itself in the Union Jack and took pride in the kingdom’s role in the industrial revolution, the liberal enlightenment and more recently in helping to defeat the Nazis in the Second World War. I’m old enough to remember the long-gone days before 24/7 TV, when the BBC’s daily schedule ended with the national anthem (God Save the Queen), a reminder to turn the telly off. As a critically thinking opponent of imperialism in all its forms I often wondered if the British establishment, as victors in many imperial battles and two world wars, had successfully airbrushed British war crimes out of history books. George Orwell recounted in his 1934 book, a Clergyman’s Daughter, how the history and geography textbooks used in private schools would view the world entirely through the prism of people’s adaptation to superior British civilisation as it emerged in the Victorian era. Books would show missionaries civilising grateful natives. The more people adapted to British values, the worthier they were as human beings. This begs the question, whose relevance will soon become clear, just who belongs to the British establishment? Is the British establishment, as I once naively thought, simply the most influential wheelers and dealers in England, Scotland and Wales who have some sort of connection with the common folk of this island kingdom? Did the East India Company colonise many parts of Southern Asia to help the peasants and labourers back home or to expand their own mercantile empire? One may argue that the immense wealth that large trading companies and banks accrued from their exploitation of the colonies eventually filtered back to the middle and working classes, but these modest rewards did not really bear fruit until the post-war boom of the 1950s just as the ruling classes decommissioned the remainder of their Empire. Certainly the Empire required much larger managerial and engineering classes to support their expansionist endeavours, but let us not confuse the likes of Jeff Bezos, currently one of worlds’ richest influencers, with his relatively well-paid middle managers and software engineers, let alone with low-paid warehouse and delivery workers whose jobs may soon be delegated to smart robots. In times of rapid geopolitical and technological transformation, the ruling elites are quite happy not just to discard their loyal underlings, but to switch their public allegiance to religions or states. It appears the remnants of the core British establishment do not really care either about Britain or its longstanding inhabitants. They may have co-opted a variant of the English language and promoted some English-medium writers and artists, but only when it suits them. Their true goal has always been world domination by any means necessary. In the early 21st century the British establishment has been subsumed into a much larger global network who see nation states and traditional cultures as obstacles in their quest for total control. In many ways the arbiters of political correctness today view the native peoples of the British Isles in the same way as their forebears viewed the hapless indigenes of far-flung colonies. To them the great unwashed masses need to undergo re-education to adapt to our Brave New World.

When Tony Blair won his famous landslide in the 1997 general election, but with only 43.2% of the popular vote, the choreographed celebrations showed crowds waving Union Jacks with Britpop music playing in the background. The same spectacle accompanied a few months later several days of national mourning for the tragic death of Princess Diana. Yet while many ordinary citizens continued to take pride in their British identity, the ruling elites were already rebranding old Blighty as a social engineering playground detached from its roots, but still featuring a few iconic landmarks and historic relics. British values were redefined in terms of pop culture, multiculturalism, LGBTQ++ tolerance and love for the NHS, all at odds with the stoicism and self-reliance of past generations. Yet even Cool Britannia did not last long as Tony Blair trashed the brand’s reputation by joining George Bush’s ill-fated invasion of Iraq. In the 2003 Eurovision Song Contest, the UK notoriously scored null points, despite English being the most popular language and the UK nearly always finishing in the top ten. It was no longer cool to wave the Union Jack with imagery of The Who, the Rolling Stones or the Beatles.  The last blast of Britain’s past grandeur was over and now only the English and Welsh working classes and a few aristocrats of the Jacob Rees Mogg breed cared about the British Brand. The Brexit saga may well have been the very last gasp of British patriotism. The forlorn hope that it may restore some control to the peoples of the archipelago lingers on. Boris Johnson’s lockdown represents the ultimate trump card. If Boris truly believed  in civil liberties and favoured herd immunity, as he once claimed, then he could have sacked Matt Hancock and called on alternative experts such as Professor Sunetra Gupta from Oxford University, who supports the Swedish model. This begs another question: who is really in control? We may love to channel our anger at politicians for calamitous policies. Some may blame Tony Blair for destabilising the Middle East, but he simply represented a clique within the US/UK foreign policy establishment who saw regime change wars as a means to a greater end, world domination. More or less the same cabal now support medical martial law and once again with humanitarian pretexts. The Tony Blair Institute even proudly announced on social media that their teams are “.... now embedded in governments around the world, helping them to keep their people safe during this pandemic - not just in respect of Covid-19 itself but also the political and economic collateral damage. “ Behind our top politicians are always teams of advisors working alongside corporate lobby groups, think tanks and NGOs. While in January it may have appeared that Boris Johnson was at loggerheads with some sections of the global establishment over the UK’s withdrawal from the EU, this was always a façade. Boris’s advisors knew that by March 2020 the UK’s relationship with the EU would be irrelevant because all Western countries would have to the follow the self-destructive diktats of the World Health Organisation.

The world’s elites have now dissociated themselves not only from the former British, French, Dutch,  Japanese, German, Portuguese and  Spanish Empires, but amazingly from the American Empire too. They have disowned the very superpower that oversaw the biggest rise in prosperity and living standards in human history. Donald Trump may well be the last nominal President who claims to believe in American exceptionalism. The new breed of US-based super-billionaires do not care about protecting the living standards of their fellow citizens. They grew rich by outsourcing most of their manufacturing to the Far East and relying on cheap-imported labour. Meanwhile US foreign policy has hit a roadblock. They spent trillions of dollars attempting to reshape the Middle East and succeeded mainly in losing the trust both of the local peoples and their rulers. Pakistan and Iran do not need the US anymore. They can trade much more easily with nearby China and India.

Rather than adapt to Asian superpowers with strong regional roots, the world’s elites have embraced a new form of global welfarism that will enslave the workless masses and only reward the much smaller managerial and engineering classes. The deceptive language of identity politics serves to conceal a massive transfer of wealth and power away from the general population, up to their eyeballs in debt, to the chosen few. In our emerging Brave New World we will see two rival belief systems: The official doctrine of equality and diversity, parroted by social workers and the brainwashed masses alike, and the classified reality of a rigid caste system that condemns most of humanity to complete subservience.

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